Group Therapies

illustration of four men sitting together during a group therapy sessionResearch in the substance abuse field has consistently shown that group therapy is one of the most effective techniques to empower individuals on their journey to recovery from substance abuse. According to the treatment protocols developed for substance abuse professionals by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, group therapy provides participants with a number of unique benefits. One key benefit is removing the feeling of isolation that is often experienced by chronic substance abusers and enabling those in treatment to witness the successful treatment outcomes of others facing similar challenges.

photo of two people walking on a beach at sunsetOur clients at Seaside Palm Beach find tremendous communal strength in numbers. Whether that be in the form of couples therapy or in our psychodrama therapy sessions, we find that the more support a person has, the better their chances of recovery. Our couples program is designed to help people whose romantic relationships have been negatively impacted by substance abuse. Excessive and addictive drug and alcohol use eats away of the foundation of any romantic relationship. When couples can journey down the road of recovery together, the result is a strengthened bond and a brighter and healthier future.

During our psychodrama therapy sessions, individuals gain a better understanding of how their behavior affects those around them. Through role-playing exercises, our therapists help each client to recreate interactions that have contributed to their substance abuse and explore the thought-processes that lead to those problematic interactions so they can better manage their relationships.

Advantages of Group Treatment

• Groups provide positive peer support and pressure to abstain from substances of abuse.

• Groups reduce the sense of isolation that most people who have substance abuse disorders experience.

• Groups enable people who abuse substances to witness the recovery of others.

• Groups help members learn to cope with their substance abuse and other problems by allowing them to see how others deal with similar problems.

• Groups can provide useful information to clients who are new to recovery.

• Groups provide feedback concerning the values and abilities of other group members.

• Groups offer family?like experiences.

• Groups encourage, coach, support, and reinforce as members undertake difficult or anxiety?provoking tasks.

• Groups offer members the opportunity to learn or relearn the social skills they need to cope with everyday life instead of resorting to substance abuse.

• Groups can effectively confront individual members about substance abuse and other harmful behaviors.

• Groups allow a single treatment professional to help a number of clients at the same time.

• Groups can add needed structure and discipline to the lives of people with substance use disorders, who often enter treatment with their lives in chaos.

• Groups instill hope, a sense that “If he can make it, so can I.”

• Groups often support and provide encouragement to one another outside the group setting.